Tree Lopping

  • Tree Lopping Hazards

    May 17, 2012 at 7:28 am

    Australian Standards for the pruning of amenity trees outlines the correct methods for pruning. Australian Standards apply to most goods and many services consumers buy and are created to ensure purchasers obtain safe, high quality outcomes. These standards were created after acknowledgement that the practice of Tree Lopping was delivering poor quality outcomes for both trees and clients. Tree Lopping is still mistakenly believed by many people (even some gardeners and horticulturalists) to be a valid form of hazard reduction…

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  • An Arborist vs Tree Lopper

    May 17, 2012 at 7:28 am

    As a rough rule of thumb never use a tree service provider who calls themselves a lopper, as selling lopping services to amenity trees in Australia is not legal, as the practice increases the risk of tree limb failure over time and also increases the risk of tree health decline further adding to the risks of limb or total tree failure. Tree Lopping is a term that is synonymous with cheap tree work of poor standards. It may also be…

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  • Why not to Lop

    May 17, 2012 at 7:27 am

    When a tree is lopped, cuts are made to significant limbs in usually indiscriminate places. These pruning cuts, especially in our native trees, promote smaller growth shoots called epicormic growth. These shoots grow into new tree limbs and time and research have proven that epicormic limbs are generally poorly attached to the primary tree limb. This poor attachment results in increased frequency and risk of limb drop or failure over time – thus creating future hazards as a result of…

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  • Tree Lopping

    May 17, 2012 at 7:27 am

    Tree Lopping has unfortunately become a term synonymous with trees and tree work, particularly budget priced tree pruning and tree removal. Historically trees were lopped by literally cutting the tops off tree canopies and major limbs. This practice was initially thought to reduce the hazards associated with tree and branch failure. But over time factual evidence from across the world has proven that in most species of trees (including our eucalypts) this practice actually achieves the opposite effect.

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